Random Melody Rewatch Observations 1

I say 1 because I am sure there will be more, and my rewatch got interrupted. Of course, the real rewatch will be after I get a DVD. Which will have unexpected challenges. My brother gave me Bohemian Rhapsody. Which I tried to watch it on the computer, it kept stopping because the drive barfed. Or the connection to the computer or the controller on the motherboard did. I gave up partway through. It came with the ability to watch digitally, so I can finish it after activating that. In the meantime, it’s about time for a replacement computer anyway.

Anyway, I got as far as the scene where the bus fills up and a bunch of the kids get left waiting at the bus stop for the next bus. Then I was interrupted.

The class theme that is one aspect of the film starts right away, with the Boy’s Brigade director mentioning “better class of recruit,” comparing Ornshaw and Daniel in particular. Then you get it from Mrs. Latimer. Daniel seems a bit oblivious, but Ornshaw is totally aware of it. He is obviously more worldly, too, winking flirtily at Mrs. Latimer, having been drinking whiskey, presumably, and looking at girly magazine pictures in religion class.

We see Daniel’s room after he’s naughty, but I’d thought we’d never seen Melody’s room, or any of her flat but the hall and the kitchen/dining room, and a bit of the bathroom. I’d forgotten she goes into some bedroom or another to take clothing out of a wardrobe. Now, the clothing and room made me think it was an adult bedroom, but I don’t know. When she gets evicted from playing the recorder and gets sent off to the pub to get money for ice cream from her father, she first goes into that same bedroom. Then we see her coming out across the courtyard. I’d interpreted putting the recorder in the big vase and going through that door as going outside. It would make sense to go in her room before leaving, though, and as I’ve said, we don’t have to see every last detail in sequence.

The opening scene with Melody really emphasizes two points. First, she is being a kid, but she’s not really a little kid anymore. The other kids swarming the rag man are little. She’s old and mature by comparison, and perhaps doesn’t belong there. We are seeing the last weekend of her childhood, in a sense.

By comparison with Ornshaw, Daniel really is completely innocent in his looking at nude pictures, because he wants to try painting a nude as an art subject he hasn’t tried before.

At break, we see the girls being very much interested in boys and in Muriel not hogging them all, and laughing about the idea of kissing bringing babies. They might be innocent of the exact mechanics, but they aren’t little kids.

I think that’s about it to that point. My big takeaway was the way it shows the kids transitioning in “age,” shows the class issues, and shows the adults negatively.

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