What Do They Talk About?

I just remembered a topic about Melody (which I refuse to refer to as SWALK or S.W.A.L.K. because the distribution company that renamed it that was idiotic) (though if you watch the end of the film you see an artifact of even the filmmakers having thoughts of alternate names, on the screen where it says “To Love Somebody” toward the upper left and the Melody signature appears to the lower right) (But I digress parenthetically, isn’t that annoying?) that I might have mentioned in other contexts, but haven’t given its own attention.

What do Melody and Daniel talk about when they are together, to the extent they talk?

There’s a lot to be said for the glow of simply being together, and they fell for each other without needing to date, converse, and get to know each other. But it’s not like they’re going to move on to horizontal communication if they run out of things to say and the glow isn’t enough.

I know, I know. Petty details. Just enjoy the story.

Up to the point when she waits for him and snatches him from Tom Ornshaw, I believe the extent of verbal communication between them has been, first, his asking to sit with her at lunch and her response. If Ornshaw hadn’t dragged him to the other table, maybe more words would have been exchanged. Not like she wasn’t interested. Second, his asking her to dance. Anything else was looks exchanged, as far as we are shown.

They talk on the way to the spot in the cemetery where they sit, but we don’t know what they say. They have the famous scene that we get to witness. They talk on the way to her house, but we hear music, and at least part of it has to do with crossing the street and maybe intentionally sneaking across without the cop.

They don’t talk to each other during tea, in front of her family, at least on camera. Who knows how long he’s there or what else transpires. Obviously they had to talk enough to plan the day of skipping school together, however long after that was.

What always bothers me is the conversation sitting in the shelter when it rains. It’s the kind of thing you might expect from kids in school. What class would you be in right now makes sense, but since school would be the thing they have most in common to talk about, by then you might think they’d have talked about subjects they like or hate. When they’re building the sand castle, they talk about their families and trips, and what they are doing. That’s where the topic of getting married comes up, and she sounds sensible about it. They both have a feel for how miserable people can become with age. Perhaps that adds impetus when they become so keen on marrying now.

I see them running out of things to say pretty quickly. They can talk about things they like or do, such as his painting. Arguably the film could have been written to include having him paint her. They need a better understanding of what their future options may be before they can talk a lot about what they want to do in the future.

Maybe I’m just being an old misery, being pessimistic. I am reminded of the last and primary date I went on with the third of my Melody girls, Maddie. It was very uncomfortable, sitting in a restaurant in Salem, just kind of staring at her because I had absolutely no idea what to say. Now, that could be partly just me and my autistic leanings, but we really didn’t have much in common. Right about then, it really did need to segue into something physical, or else end. For better or worse, I did the equivalent of going to the arcade with Ornshaw instead of catching the hints (like playing Physical on the jukebox, duh). I was put off by the lack of anything in common to make for conversation. I hadn’t even seen Breakfast at Tiffany’s yet. Heh. I also perceived her as being considerably less intelligent, and that was a turn off, even had she been even cuter than she was. And she was, but I have learned in my life that people wind up closer later than they seem younger, as their brains sort of… power up… at different rates. She eventually became pretty successful, both beautiful and well preserved, and, as near as I can tell, not straight.

My point is having nothing much to talk about can be brutal. The fact that they would have each other and be essentially growing up together the rest of they way might inherently give them common ground. The fact that she is jovial and a talker, while he is moodier, quieter, perhaps more maudlin, might mean that she manages to carry the conversational duties.

The wife and I never run out of things to say. It’s entirely possible that in about six year or so we’ll find ourselves apart, but it’s hard to picture just on that basis. It would have been wonderful if combined with the kind of romantic love Daniel and Melody have. Not sure what I’d do with that! Besides want to get married and stay that way forever.

Update:

I thought I had added an update to this. I later thought about myself at around that age with my friend Zack, and the fact we absolutely never ran out of things to talk about. We didn’t even go to the same school, so we had attending the same grade in common, but not the same grade together. It might not be as bad as I’d been thinking. It’s just that it needed to be put into what would fit the script.

Update 2:

I had added an update! To the wrong post. Duh! So below is the text that I had meant as the update that I attempted to redo above.

Thinking about this subsequently, I realized that when I was that age, my best friend Zack and I never ran out of things to talk about. It’s the closest I can come up with tot he same relationship at about the same age. In reality, all that distinguishes it from being the same is that he wasn’t a girl. It was emotionally intense. The kids in the movie would rapidly be, if nothing else, best friends, or it wouldn’t last anyhow. I may have taken too much from a more adult scenario of tentatively establishing a relationship and not knowing what to say to have an engaging conversation. Still, I’m also thinking of their limited worldview versus the type of relationship – sex entirely aside, since even when you’re older there has to be much more to it or it can’t last and be stable – represented by actual marriage.

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