Google Is a Funny Thing

All the more so paired with AWSTATS, which purports to give results on search strings but really doesn’t. On the HTTPS version of the page, the only search string listed for this month is:
“melody s.w.a.l.k. release”

This blog is on the 4th page of Google results, but the result points to the category for Mark Lester. Not for Melody the movie, or just the site overall, or the post that uses enough of the above terms together to make the search work. Weird.

The top hits for melody s.w.a.l.k. release are things like March 28, 1971, parsed and displayed prominently by Google with a graphic linking a search for Melody. Next, per most searches, is the title for the link to “Melody (1971 film) – Wikipedia” linking to the Wikipedia entry.

Then it’s an offering of associated videos, IMDB, a Facebook post on the making of Melody, Rotten Tomatoes, and then it goes from there.

On my non-SSL stats, I show that there have been 1228 hits from Google proper (another 303 from Google Hong Kong) through May 26 for the month, but there’s nothing but nonsense words searched by bots, spammers, hackers or such in the list of search phrases or words. The most popular pages besides the main page are the post on Melodye and a Dog Named Boo, the category of Melody the movie, and a couple Game of Thrones posts. That doesn’t count all the traffic that pounds the pages that are hacker and spammer targets. This is how you can have a blog with comments turned off and still get comments. Mine are on, at least for an initial period of time after I write a post, but nobody ever comments. Just spammers.

I’d love to know what all the searches are that get here via Google.

Update:
Mission accomplished. This post moved me to the first page of results for that string, no quotes, and pointing at the Melody category. Using quotes makes me the only hit other than Google’s information thing that answers the question through AI or whatever.

As for the Melodye post, however else people get there, I’m high up in the hits for the woman’s birth name, and near the top if you add her married surname. Which begs the question of whether that’s how people end up there, searching that name, or if it’s some other way.

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