The Iron Throne

I don’t really have much new to say about the Game of Thrones finale, but I at least wanted to post using the correct episode name. Since it doesn’t show the name initially, I guessed that the episode was A Dream of Spring, as many had assumed.

When I went to watch the bonus “making of” episode well after 9:00 last night, it was not yet available, so I did my neglected rewatch of the finale. I didn’t hate it in the first place, though I understand the complaints. I neither like nor dislike it more after a rewatch. Well, maybe I dislike it more. I particularly liked one YouTuber’s alternate ending to the series. Any such thing pretty much requires going back multiple episodes. The bottom line in that was that to kill the Night King you had to go burn the weirwood on the Isle of Faces, but doing so removed magic from the world, and with it Jon’s resurrection. The show really did nothing to address the magic system and whether it would wane, go away, or grow further. Some have considered the birth of the dragons to have increased the level of magic. The weirwoods obviously are magic, and with them the fact of the Three Eyed Raven.

I loved Sansa telling her uncle to sit down when he was giving a long campaign speech.

I would be surprised if Bran is not who GRRM intends to “win” the game. Really, the Starks won. I would be surprised if the details of how the outcome happens are anywhere close to the same. I wouldn’t be surprised if in the books we get some of the more virtual and magical elements I was waiting for, even if he ultimately meant for the battle for the throne to be primary and meant for it to be a battle with dual threats: ice and fire. I buy Arya as the killer of the Night King. It does explain her arc. Maybe that’s not straight from Martin. He did sit down with the producers and give them the rundown on where the characters were intended to end up, so if he died and given the lack of books in the latter part of the story, they could finish it with the broader strokes of “as intended.”

I do believe Dan and Dave wanted to move on and rushed the final season. The final season could easily have been longer or have gone through a season 9. But this is why, as I read somewhere after posting about the Wheel of Time show, they intend to cover more than one book of WoT per season. Even at 2 books per season that’s seven seasons. Some of the books don’t really give you half a season of material, if you really trim things down. They might be able to do it in five. As I surmised in my look at the episode titles, the first five episodes take us into the second book and thus we ought to be at least through the first two books by the end of season one. Books four and five are thicker and meatier, so it might get harder in places. You can’t really shortchange the Dothraki (borrowings again?) Aiel too much, take out Asmodean and the need for training, that sort of thing. The walk through Rhuidean is vital. At least the show will have books to work from the whole way.

Leaving Drogon alive with Dany’s body is a huge fan fic opening, if nothing else. So is Bran’s effort to locate Drogon. So is John in the far north. So is Arya’s voyage of exploration.

We never learned what the voice from the flames said to Varys. I always expected we would. Did that simply have no significance beyond helping set his direction in life? Was Varys in some way vital to saving the world indirectly? GoT did something similar to WoT in that characters who might not have been the most major were vital by doing things like saving characters who then did something vital. In WoT, Rand couldn’t have saved the world without, in particular, Perrin, Mat, Nynaeve, and Moiraine. Min helps him know what needs to be done and with his sanity. Egwene brings the Aes Sedai and is a Big Damn Hero. Elayne teaches him politics and how to be a king, and is a good war leader. Thom keeps him alive along the way. It goes on. Lan teaches him how to fight and some of the politics as well, and is a Big Damn Hero. Perrin wouldn’t be Perrin without Faile, much as most of us hate her. There’s a fundamental interconnectedness. Theon turned out to be vital. Baeric had a vital role.

The thing is, if R’hllor is the god of fire and light, and helped oppose the Night King because that’s ice, the opposing force, then what of fire getting all out of control in King’s Landing. It strikes me that a form of potential evil helped against a different evil, then flared itself. The R’hllor people always preached for Daenerys and that makes sense, but that makes them evil on the fire side, along with her.

I loved the back and forth between the different wolf items. Ironically, Bran doesn’t use a wolf, but a raven. Jon represents as Stark, perhaps the most so. Bran represents as Other. Sansa struck me as hollow. I mean, perfect and appropriate ending for her. What she always wanted. But it rings hollow and forlorn through all the pomp and acclaim. Arya goes off to her doom or perhaps amazing things. Jon seems forlorn but is in an appropriate place doing the appropriate thing, protecting the free folk.

It occurs to me that the most Thom Merrilin figure from GoT is Davos. Thom has a bit of Arya, skilled assassin. He is also a gleeman (or more of a court bard), which is not something they have, not in an overt way, in GoT.

I love that the iron throne was melted down. It needed to go.

I did start to watch the special episode, but it was late and I was bored. At the point when I stopped, the episode wasn’t what I’d expected. I was thinking there’d be a lot of talk about what they were thinking when they created this season, maybe a look back at the series and memories of making it. I wasn’t expecting costumers and stuff. Maybe I’ll watch the rest some time.

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